Invented Elements

Type Butter – Optical Kerning

Good idea, but is inventing an element the right approach?

My reason to bring this up is that I’m very interested by how TypeButter accomplishes its kerning: it inserts kern elements with inline style attributes that bear letter-spacing values. Not span elements, kern elements. No, you didn’t miss an HTML5 news bite; there is no kern element, nor am I aware of a plan for one. TypeButter basically invents a specific-purpose element.

The iPad 3 and Moore’s Law

The iPad 3 and Moore’s Law

Interesting read from Quirks Mode, on how the iPad 3’s display will actually hurt the mobile web in particular, by creating a demand for larger downloads to accommodate for the hi-resolution screen.

In order to display properly on the iPad 3, all graphics of both web apps and native apps must be doubled in pixel density, which means their size roughly quadruples. Clever compression will solve part of that problem, but not nearly enough.

The problem is even worse with the mobile web. Jason Grigsby delved into the way Apple itself serves Retina-optimised images to its new iPad site. Essentially, they download the normal images first, and if a check for the iPad 3 is positive it then downloads the optimised images.

Magazines on the iPad

For New Yorker on iPad, Words Are the Thing – NYTimes

The New Yorker magazine takes a lot of heat for using Adobe’s iPad publishing tool. It outputs files with large footprints, unselectable copy, and little support for native iPad features, like pinch and zoom. Their numbers show though, that in the end, the bells and whistles matter much less than you may think.

Offering the first detailed glimpse into iPad magazine sales since subscriptions became available in the spring, The New Yorker said that it now had 100,000 iPad readers, including about 20,000 people who bought subscriptions at $59.99 a year.

The New Yorker, a magazine that has always been heavy on text, took a different tack from its peers. Instead of loading its iPad app with interactive features, the magazine focused on presenting its articles in a clean, readable format.

And then there’s the ability for print subscribers to download any issue on the iPad. This is the direction all print publications need to head.

…More than 75,000 people have taken advantage of the magazine’s offer to allow print subscribers to download the app free.

Give me great content and a usable delivery platform and I’ll give you my money. Plain and simple.

And from an interview with David Remnick in November 2010:

He said there are vast possibilities for interactive reading that will appear on the New Yorker’s iPad, but those will come when he establishes a proper subscription model so that there is a critical mass of people consuming the materal;

You can’t force a new medium. Take Wired magazine for example, also owned by New Yorker parents, Conde-Nast; their content has consistently declined while they’ve revamped layout and interactivity in both their print and iPad versions.

geo-taggers

Geo Tagged art

Hulu Plus – It’s amazing how much people budget for TV/movies. One can only assume, Hulu Plus will actually be successful. / text-rendering: optimizeLegibility; / Web fonts at the Crossing / A jQuery based solution for customized checkboxes and radio buttons I’m using in a current project and am quite fond of. / artsy iPhone and iPad wallpapers / jQuery Fundamentals a large ‘must-read’. / Simple, multiple gmail from addresses on iPad / iPhone without setting up a bunch of email accounts. Just like your desktop based Gmail! / The 101 Best Sandwiches in New York / Bing Destination Map: Automatic Napkin Sketching of Maps = cute maps. / The Geotaggers’ World Atlas – cuz art is nice.