I’d like to say I’d like to post at least links, occasionally

Reading (Read):

I Am An Object Of Internet Ridicule, Ask Me Anything

For all the hateful words that were lobbed at me, it barely ever bubbled over from the world of online forums and websites. I received zero angry emails, only a few mean tweets. My Facebook was never broken into and vandalized—my typewriter remains unsmashed, no one has ever threatened violence towards me in real life. Instead, there are these pockets of the web that are small and ignorable, filled with hate for a picture of me, for this idea of a hipster—for the audacity of bringing a typewriter to a park.

RAISING THE DEAD

At the bottom of the biggest underwater cave in the world, diving deeper than almost anyone had ever gone, Dave Shaw found the body of a young man who had disappeared ten years earlier. What happened after Shaw promised to go back is nearly unbelievable—unless you believe in ghosts.

HOW CHRIS MCCANDLESS DIED

Twenty-one years ago this month, on September 6, 1992, the decomposed body of Christopher McCandless was discovered by moose hunters just outside the northern boundary of Denali National Park. He had died inside a rusting bus that served as a makeshift shelter for trappers, dog mushers, and other backcountry visitors.

A Death in Valdosta

Multisport athlete Kendrick Johnson was found dead in his Georgia high school’s gymnasium in January. Authorities ruled it an accident, but Johnson’s family believes something very different — and a second autopsy appears to support their suspicions.

Reading (Read) > Nerd:
Sprites, Semantics & Scalability: A Demo with Playing Cards
I finally understand percentage based background-size and background-position, as the opportunity to build a set of responsive, single-sprite playing cards, recently presented itself.

Semantic CSS With Intelligent Selectors
Ultimately, reading this piece has led me to take the HTML5 ROLE attribute seriously.

Effeckt.css
I have yet to put this library of pre-built CSS3 animations to use, but certainly, I must.

Watching (Watched):
Longmire, Season 1 (Netflix Watch Instantly)
Entertaining westernish, one crime per episode, usually ends in a shootout.

Broadchurch, Season 1
Greatly paced, no-frills, who-done-it murder mystery.

Derek (Netflix Watch Instantly)
Surely you’ve seen this already. I called my grandmother, just to say hello.

Photoshop CS6

Photoshop CS6

First is support for Autosave and background saving. Gone are the horrors of losing hours of editing due to a crash or waiting seemingly endless minutes while a large image is being saved. This change alone is worth upgrading for anyone who uses Photoshop every day.

untied

I don’t follow football. I do appreciate thoughtful, alternative, problem solving skills though.

Did the Packers untying Ndamukong Suh’s shoes set him off?

“This guy is going to get killed. I got to take his mind off it, give him something else to do.” So he says, “Ok, every time you’re in a pile, I want you to focus on something. I want you to untie his shoes.”

Friday Link Day

Add a preview pane in Gmail

You can enable the feature by turning it on from the Labs tab in your Gmail settings

Natural user interface is a red herring, what we really need is a Dyson sphere

I would argue that instead of attempting to make our computer interaction look more like “real life” or be more “physical,” the UX designer should attempt to make humans more efficient by capturing and utilizing a larger portion of the user’s existing output (through new and existing sensors in our devices), instead of just capturing a different, contrived sort of output.

iPad Head Girl

From the comments:

Four ipads on her head and she was reading a real book? Shows just how useful iPads are.

How to Build a Newsroom Time Machine

Florida Atlantic University student newspaper, the University Press recently created an entire issue, the ‘old’ way.

“Manual typewriters didn’t have a number 1 key. They used a lower-case L instead.”

Magazines on the iPad

For New Yorker on iPad, Words Are the Thing – NYTimes

The New Yorker magazine takes a lot of heat for using Adobe’s iPad publishing tool. It outputs files with large footprints, unselectable copy, and little support for native iPad features, like pinch and zoom. Their numbers show though, that in the end, the bells and whistles matter much less than you may think.

Offering the first detailed glimpse into iPad magazine sales since subscriptions became available in the spring, The New Yorker said that it now had 100,000 iPad readers, including about 20,000 people who bought subscriptions at $59.99 a year.

The New Yorker, a magazine that has always been heavy on text, took a different tack from its peers. Instead of loading its iPad app with interactive features, the magazine focused on presenting its articles in a clean, readable format.

And then there’s the ability for print subscribers to download any issue on the iPad. This is the direction all print publications need to head.

…More than 75,000 people have taken advantage of the magazine’s offer to allow print subscribers to download the app free.

Give me great content and a usable delivery platform and I’ll give you my money. Plain and simple.

And from an interview with David Remnick in November 2010:

He said there are vast possibilities for interactive reading that will appear on the New Yorker’s iPad, but those will come when he establishes a proper subscription model so that there is a critical mass of people consuming the materal;

You can’t force a new medium. Take Wired magazine for example, also owned by New Yorker parents, Conde-Nast; their content has consistently declined while they’ve revamped layout and interactivity in both their print and iPad versions.