viewport at-rule disables Chrome 29 CSS Inpsector

When the @viewport rule is used at the top of your CSS, Chrome’s CSS Inspector stops working and all line numbers are printed out as line 1.

Comment out the @viewport {} rule or move it to the end of your CSS to fix the DevTools.

This error did not occur in Chrome versions previous to 29.0.1547.57

Here’s a JS Fiddle demonstrating the problem.

Invented Elements

Type Butter – Optical Kerning

Good idea, but is inventing an element the right approach?

My reason to bring this up is that I’m very interested by how TypeButter accomplishes its kerning: it inserts kern elements with inline style attributes that bear letter-spacing values. Not span elements, kern elements. No, you didn’t miss an HTML5 news bite; there is no kern element, nor am I aware of a plan for one. TypeButter basically invents a specific-purpose element.

Photoshop CS6

Photoshop CS6

First is support for Autosave and background saving. Gone are the horrors of losing hours of editing due to a crash or waiting seemingly endless minutes while a large image is being saved. This change alone is worth upgrading for anyone who uses Photoshop every day.

The iPad 3 and Moore’s Law

The iPad 3 and Moore’s Law

Interesting read from Quirks Mode, on how the iPad 3’s display will actually hurt the mobile web in particular, by creating a demand for larger downloads to accommodate for the hi-resolution screen.

In order to display properly on the iPad 3, all graphics of both web apps and native apps must be doubled in pixel density, which means their size roughly quadruples. Clever compression will solve part of that problem, but not nearly enough.

The problem is even worse with the mobile web. Jason Grigsby delved into the way Apple itself serves Retina-optimised images to its new iPad site. Essentially, they download the normal images first, and if a check for the iPad 3 is positive it then downloads the optimised images.

Delicious Chrome Extension

The Delicious Chrome Extension currently has 33,414 users and is rated 4/5 stars. However, until yesterday’s release, you had to manually close the popup window after you saved a new bookmark. It wasn’t unusable, but it was terribly annoying at best.

Well, suffer no more! v1.5 of the Delicious Chrome Extension automatically closes the popup after you’ve saved your bookmark; and it’s available right now!

Another well-received feature is it’s customizable keyboard shortcut. Some people like commnd-D, others like control-D or maybe you like something entirely random to save your bookmarks; It’s totally up to you.

Screenshots of v1.5 of the Delicious Chrome Extension:

The ‘Save to Delicious’ popup adds selected text to the notes field.

Customizable keyboard shortcut key.

Quick links to invoke the Save to Delicious popup, your Delicious bookmarks and your Delicious Inbox.

The extension source now lives on GitHub. Please, fork it, make it better, and send me a pull request. I’m certain there are several ways this extension can be made better. Or contribute by reporting any issues or feature requests.