A Few

Apparently people have been using pinch-to-zoom on their desktop browsers? Which actually may not be that crazy, since those Apple laptops sell pretty well. Not surprisingly, Chrome’s pinch-to-zoom wasn’t as smooth as Safari’s. The latest Chrome Canary aims to fix that.

Also news to me, the Internet Archive has an entire Archived Software Library, which is pretty rad, if you’re into that sort of thing. It looks like now, those archived pieces of software (read: games) are now embeddable. Pretty rad, again, if you’re into that sort of thing. Note: The embedded games seem to have mixed results. But what a concept! Next on their list: Export a game as HTML5. Just kidding.

If you didn’t buy the in-app purchase of the full toolset in Paper, way back when, all the Paper tools are now available for free.

US Army’s First Open Source Project

The changelog reports that the US Army open sourced a network traffic analysis framework.

This code was paid for by tax-payer dollars. It is the first repo to be made available under the US Army Research Laboratory organization.

The US Army Research Laboratory has been around since 1992. William Glodek has the initial commit and has been a GitHub member since Nov 3, 2014.

Here’s the modern day ‘Your Tax Dollars at Work’ road sign, for the information superhighway.

Is the iPad Not Mobile?

The popular iOS app, Flipboard, aims to elevate content layout and interaction on the web.

Flipboard for mobile web is a case study in pushing the browser to its limits. While this approach may not be suitable for all applications, for us it’s enabled a level of interaction and performance that rivals native apps.

Flipboard.com’s approach largely involves eschewing traditional HTML, CSS, & Javascript, in favor of HTML5’s canvas element.

While interesting (and a bit over my head), why is it that when visiting Flipboard.com on the iPad, we’re presented with a roadblock page, instructing us to use the iPad app for “the best Flipboard experience”?

Where’s the mobile canvas experience that rivals native apps?


Input type=email, Most Commonly Used Advanced Input Type

Poll results: popular input types

The results are surprising, while I expected date and number to end in first and second place, the most popular type was actually email.

Personally, I would have guessed that type="tel" would be leading the charge. Not for telephone entries specifically, but any input that is expecting a number of any kind, the type="tel" attribute invokes the number keyboard on iOS devices; Minus the finicky limitations that are associated with type="number".


Grunticon – A Flexible SVG Workflow

Grunticon is a Grunt.js task that makes it easy to use SVGs for crisp, resolution independent icons, logos, illustrations and background images. SVGs aren’t supported everywhere so Grunticon auto-generates bitmap (PNG) fallback images and loads the right format for compatibility with pretty much any browser

If you’re just getting started with SVG’s, this may be a bit intense. Otherwise, this grunt task looks like it contains some useful options, such as auto-generating fallbacks for that sometimes-we-still-need-to-support IE8.

Safari iOS Bigger Than Firefox

Safari iOS bigger than Firefox; non-Google Chromia bigger than Safari Mac

  • Safari on iOS is now bigger than Firefox.
  • The non-Google Chromia are now bigger than Safari on Mac.
  • Mobile is at 31% of overall browser market share. That’s nearly one third.
  • The Blink rendering engine is now at 43% market share.

Non-Google Chromia is the open-source Chromium, which is often installed on mobile devices by default, for example, on Samsung phones.